Porn is More Than a Moral Issue

The moral arguments against pornography are well-known. There is a growing body of evidence suggests that pornography fuels demand for prostitutes—and therefore, human sex trafficking victims, who often end up ensnared in both trades. Research by the Johns Hopkins’ Protection Project has identified several links of the porn industry with the “industry” of sex trafficking:

  1. Forced participation in film production – If force, fraud or coercion is used to compel performers to perform for the camera, this can constitute sex trafficking.
  2. Forced participation in prostitution – Traffickers may exploit their victims through prostitution as well as on film. There have been cases where underage girls, under a pimp’s control, were forced to provide commercial sex in addition to performing in pornographic videos filmed by the pimp. Runaways and children kicked out of their homes are some of the most vulnerable to sex trafficking. According to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, the annual number of images and videos of suspected child pornography reached over 17 million in 2011.
  3. Forced exposure to porn – Pimps and traffickers sometimes use pornographic films as grooming tools, forcing new victims to watch repeatedly, so they become hardened and learn what is expected of them. Sustained exposure to pornography has long-standing effects, and can create a skewed sense of “normalcy.”

The path to porn addiction described by clinical psychologist Dr. Victor Cline shows how easily viewers can find themselves in a place they never thought possible:

  • Addiction: Porn consumers get hooked and often keep coming back for more.
  • Escalation: Increased levels of exposure are often needed to stimulate to the same degree.
  • Desensitization: Over time and exposure, the witnessing of certain acts can lose its shock factor and becomes more “normal.”
  • Acting out: Viewers may have an increased tendency to act out behaviors seen in pornography

Evidence suggests frequent viewers tend to be more frequent purchasers of prostitutes—an illegal behavior that often involves victims of sex trafficking. Pornography can be a vehicle by which people become objects to view and to use, and a catalyst to fuel demand. And you can bet, traffickers will answer it.

Learn more at Marny McNall’s Relevant Magazine article: The Justice Side of Porn.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s