Talking to Children About Modern Day Slavery

Parents may ask how to talk to their children about an issue as dark and complex as modern day slavery. The following advice, organized by age ranges, helps answer that question. But in applying this advice, keep in mind that children vary drastically in their development. Some will be ready for information at an early age, some late.

Ages 3 -5: Young preschoolers understand three things well: children, home, and family. Use these concepts as the starting point of talking with them about this issue – or any injustice involving other children. It can be enough for them to learn that some children have families who are not able to take care of them and they need a safe home. Other details are not necessary.

Ages 6 – 8: During this stage of life children slowly became aware of slavery and injustice in the past through picture books about Abraham Lincoln and other figures involved in freedom and abolition. You can begin to introduce the idea that there are still slaves in the world today – people, even children, forced to work in ways they would not choose and cannot quit even if they want to.

Young children are beautifully idealistic and may ask if they can help after learning that slavery still exists. Much of the slavery in the world exists around the production of coffee, chocolate, and other goods. You and your family can find out how many slaves currently work for you by discovering your slavery footprint and use this information to change your purchasing decisions.

Ages 9 -11: During this age range you can begin to present the idea of sex trafficking and exploitation – depending on how much your children know about sex. A way to approach the conversation is to discuss these questions:

What if someone offered you money if you would steal something for them?

What if someone offered to give you money if they could look at or touch your private parts?

What if nobody had ever told you that your private parts were private?

What if you thought that the only way you could eat that day, or get money for your sick mother or father, was by letting someone touch you in a bad way?

Tell them that some things are just wrong –not for sale– and that anyone who offered you money for them would be trying to trick and control you. This conversation can allow children to understand more about the issue without feeling completely overwhelmed.

Ages 12-15: The first step in educating your teens about trafficking is to educate yourself. Love 146‘s extremely helpful overview to modern-day slavery is a must read for parents, no matter how old your kids are. Young teens can comprehend more of these complex details. Read it first yourself, then determine whether your child can go through it with you, or what information from it you can extract to share with them.

Ages 16 – 18: At the right time older teens can handle the depth of information that would not be appropriate for other ages. How we talk to our kids about trafficking matters, so read about the common myths regarding this issue as well as the best language and terms to use when discussing it.

Love 146’s abolitionist curriculum can be used by families or small groups to understand modern-day slavery and develop a personal response as a task force or individual.

Learn more at Jamie Martin’s Simple Homeschool article: How to talk to your kids about modern-day slavery.

How to talk to your kids about modern-day slavery

“How much do your kids actually know about your husband’s work with Love146?”

“How do I talk to my children about an issue as dark and complex as this one?”

This post addresses those questions, providing ideas about how to approach this topic with your own family. I’ve categorized the thoughts below by age range, but please keep in mind that our kids vary drastically in their development.

Some will be ready for information at an early age, some late. I tend to veer toward the better late than early philosophy–especially when I’m giving advice to so many of you–but you are the expert in your home so adjust as needed.

Ages 3-5

– See more at: http://simplehomeschool.net/modern-day-slavery/#sthash.odMA2S20.dpuf

Over the past two weeks as I’ve written about modern-day slavery and our family’s personal mission to abolish it, a few readers have asked questions like these:

“How much do your kids actually know about your husband’s work with Love146?”

“How do I talk to my children about an issue as dark and complex as this one?”

This post addresses those questions, providing ideas about how to approach this topic with your own family. I’ve categorized the thoughts below by age range, but please keep in mind that our kids vary drastically in their development.

Some will be ready for information at an early age, some late. I tend to veer toward the better late than early philosophy–especially when I’m giving advice to so many of you–but you are the expert in your home so adjust as needed.

Ages 3-5

– See more at: http://simplehomeschool.net/modern-day-slavery/#sthash.odMA2S20.dpuf

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